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– A screening of the feature-documentary “License for Crimes” is being planned in Kyiv for February 2019. According to the organizers of the project, Ukrainian non-governmental organization Cavalier, the documentary is dedicated to the history of religious extremism in the Russian Federation.

The director of the Brussels-based NGO Human Rights Without Frontiers (HRWF), Willy Fautre, will act as an expert in the project. This is not the first time that Cavalier and HRWF have worked together. In 2016, the NGOs released a documentary entitled “Protect your dignity”, which was dedicated to the protection from and prevention against manifestations of religious extremism in modern society.

One of the key elements of the “License for Crimes” documentary is a so-called ‘Russian Federation patriot instruction manual in pre-war period’. Interestingly, the textbook is dated in the year of 2014 when Russia annexed Crimea, a first step to the military conflict in eastern Ukraine. As a consequence, the Luhansk People’s Republic (LNR) and the Donetsk People’s Republic (DPR) appeared on the map of Ukraine as separatist entities (although they are not recognized by the international community).

The textbook is said to originate from Russia. In accordance with the terms under which this textbook was shared with us, we have no right to publish the full version of this manual yet. However, we will provide a description of the key blocks of the textbook and use several of the most vivid pages to demonstrate the methodology.

According to the authors of the textbook, the Russian Federation has four types of enemies:
– Enemies of the State;
– Enemies of the Church;
– Enemies of the State policy;
– Enemies of the undeclared State policy.

The authors of the textbook call those falling under one of these four categories a “special contingent”, which must either have their activities terminated or be destroyed. Onward, there is a detailed description of three levels of training and methods to be used by Russian ‘patriots’; methods which strictly correspond to the way Jehovah’s Witnesses were eliminated from the map in Russia.

As for the authenticity of this textbook, the answer is obvious. Everything that is mentioned in the manual has been put into practice by Russia. What is very disturbing is that it gives instructions to ‘patriots’ for pre-war and war periods. Concerning the pre-war period, we see that Russia has implemented the recommendations of the handbook in Crimea and Donbass. If we look at what has happened in Crimea in the pre-war or pre-annexation period, we see that Russia had prepared the minds of the people in the peninsula, mobilizing them in one way or another to feel closer to Moscow than to Kyiv. They also prepared ‘the minds of people’ outside Crimea, asserting that it had historically been ruled by Moscow, under the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, and that it was normal to reintegrate its Russian-speaking population in the current Russian Federation. This was the first step of the pre-war period.

The next step was irregular warfare. Unidentifiable men in arms surprisingly took control of the TV station, and administrative and public buildings, including the local parliament of Crimea. A disturbing situation, as it was originally not understood as the first step of the conquest of Crimea.

We also saw the faithful implementation of the handbook for Russian ‘patriots’ in Donbass when Putin spread the idea that the Russian world was extending beyond the borders of the Russian Federation and included neighboring territories with Russian-speaking populations. Step by step, while denying any involvement, Russia created a protracted conflict in the Donbass that has made more 10 000 victims in last few years.

The manual for Russian ‘patriots’ describes strategies that were implemented before our eyes in the last few years. When it is made public, we expect that the FSB will deny association with it and say it is a provocation of Ukraine.

This textbook is unique and will present opportunities for expert discussions on national and international levels when it is revealed in its entirety.

The movie “License for Crimes” will be screened in Kyiv in February 2019. After this première, it will be shown in film festivals and in international forums, and open for discussion.

For more information about the screening of this film, contact Mr Konstantin Slobodyanyuk/ Слободянюк Константин slobodyanuk.kv@gmail.com

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