1

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1344

WORLD: Official and state-favored religions under the microscope of discrimination

Official and state-favored religions under the microscope of discrimination

USCIRF releases a report on religious freedom implications of official and favored religions

USCIRF (17.11.2022) – The United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) today released the following new report:

Global Overview of Official and Favored Religions and Legal Implications for Religious Freedom – This report provides an overview of the ways governments enforce religion through their laws and policies and the implications of that enforcement for religious freedom and related human rights. Many governments that repress religious freedom do so through laws and policies that coerce compliance with a particular religious interpretation, typically one that aligns with an official or state-favored religion. Such laws—particularly when governments actively enforce them—can lead to severe violations of freedom of religion or belief (FoRB) and other human rights, including discrimination on the basis of religion against individuals and communities who do not adhere to the state’s interpretation. The report, based on research into all countries with official or favored religions, finds that most governments with an official or favored religion also maintain laws or policies on the basis of religion that lead to discrimination or repression, or that hold the potential to do so. Far fewer such countries—less than a third—name an official or favored religion and maintain no discriminatory laws or policies based on that religion.

Further reading about FORB in the World on HRWF website





Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1344

WORLD : Stop praying for persecuted Christians exclusively

Stop praying for persecuted Christians only

We don’t demonstrate such exclusionary self-focus in other ministry spheres. Opening our aperture is biblical and aids our advocacy.

By KNOX THAMES

 

Christianity Today (04.11.2022) – https://bit.ly/3fIjmdY – It rankles me when Christians pray only for persecuted Christians.

I don’t disagree with praying for persecuted Christians, to be clear. I pray for them. They need help, as a global pandemic of persecution confronts believers daily with violence on account of their faith.

However, to truly follow the Bible’s teachings I believe we shouldn’t exclusively pray for our fellow Christians. Rather we are called to pray for all who suffer violent persecution, Christian and non-Christian alike.

 

When the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church (IDOP) arrives on November 6, many activists will pen articles about Christians being the “most persecuted” faith in the world. And certainly, persecuted Christians face severe problems worldwide.

 

From my 20 years of international work on religious freedom, I know Christians suffer violent persecution from governments like China or terrorists like Boko Haram. I’ve personally met such believers, advocated for them, and prayed for them.

 

Yet, while such “most persecuted” claims may be true, definitional problems with what constitutes persecution make such assertions hard to assess.

 

But more importantly, we are not in a competition. Christians are part of a fellowship of suffering, sharing in persecution with other faith groups. Many overlook or forget how in every context where Christians suffer, others also hurt. In fact, the severity experienced by other minority groups often surpasses Christian persecution.

Followers of Jesus certainly suffer in China and Burma (Myanmar), but Uyghur and Rohingya Muslims are victims of outright genocide by those nations’ regimes. While ISIS indeed targeted Iraqi Christians, thousands of Yazidis were murdered, sold into sex slavery, or disappeared.

Scores of Afghan Christians were forced to flee the Taliban’s return. Yet the 5 million Hazara Shia that remain face continued terrorist attacks, with a recent suicide blast murdering 50 children at school. Boko Haram has devastated churches in Nigeria’s north, while the majority Muslims that resist the jihadists’ theocracy risk death or jail for blasphemy.

Christians need not feel insecure if our suffering is less than others. However, some advocates draw false equivalencies with religious liberty limitations in North America and Europe to actual persecution abroad. Conflating violence with pandemic restrictions or other domestic debates reduces the veracity of the word persecution and kills its credibility.

 

Some governments act similarly. For example, Hungary’s Viktor Orbán often boasts about defending persecuted Christians and traditional Christian values. His diplomats speak about the twin threats to Christians of “persecution and aggressive secularism,” conflating a supposedly “dangerous” liberal elite with ISIS atrocities. Orbán’s government has indeed provided helpful money to churches in Iraq, Nigeria, and elsewhere, yet while ignoring other suffering groups next door.

 

Christians only helping Christians is not “Christian.” Troublingly, this exclusive Christians-first approach seems unique to the international religious freedom sphere.

In other contexts, believers have heroically demonstrated Christ’s love to a hurting world by feeding the hungry and assisting those in need, regardless of faith. Their generous approach reflects the best of Jesus’ message. If Christian aid groups acted otherwise, we would recoil in horror.

Imagine World Vision only providing food to starving Christians, World Relief only assisting Christian refugees, Samaritan’s Purse only helping evangelicals, or Catholic charities only assisting those looking to Rome for guidance.

The narrow focus on Christian persecution is a jarringly contorted approach to Christian charity. And practically, our exclusionary self-focus creates distance between Christ and nonbelievers.

From my time working in multifaith environments, I can attest to how outsiders find Christians’ self-promotion of Christian persecution puzzling, if not outright off-putting. They know enough about Jesus’ compassionate message that this doesn’t seem to fit. They wonder how Christians—supposed followers of a movement whose founder stressed the love of everyone, enemies included—can seemingly ignore the persecution of their non-Christian neighbors.

There should be no spiritual litmus test for helping those suffering violent persecution because of their beliefs. I’ve appreciated how David Curry of Open Doors USA and Merv Thomas of CSW have spoken out for groups as distinct as Muslims and atheists. The Southern Baptist Convention has also led, last summer becoming the first denomination to condemn the Uyghur genocide. Following these examples, Christians should lead the charge in helping everyone. Any individual persecuted on account of their beliefs is a tragedy worthy of prayer and advocacy.

 

The Bible is replete with calls to help regardless of race or creed. For example, the prophet Micah called God’s followers to “seek justice, love mercy, and walk humbly”—without caveats or exclusions. During Jesus’ earthly ministry, he explained how we should love God and our neighbors through the example of the Good Samaritan, a hero who crossed religious and ethnic lines to help a stranger. In Paul’s letter to the Galatians, he gives this dual charge: “Therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all people, especially to those who belong to the family of believers” (Gal. 6:10). As Paul instructs, we must do better at helping our own, but we must also improve how we do good to all.

In response, IDOP presents an opportunity to live out Christ’s commands to pray for our own and for others. Let’s remember our persecuted brethren, but let’s not only pray for persecuted Christians but for everyone suffering for their beliefs. We can shift to an International Day of Prayer for All the Persecuted, making it a second Holy Week of sorts.

Loving God and others summarized Jesus’ message during his earthly ministry. The body of Christ should be known for our concern for all, both Christian and not. Christ-followers beseeching God to assist anyone victimized for their faith (or non-belief) would be a powerful testimony. Doing so would improve our witness and build bridges between religions, helping minority Christians secure a brighter future in their communities.

In The Weight of Glory, C. S. Lewis wrote, “There are no ordinary people. You have never spoken to a mere mortal.” Our global neighbors, all bearing the image of God, suffer in a hurting world that needs our help.

 

If we truly believe God loves everyone and made everyone in his image, we must pray and advocate for all who suffer. Yes, we should pray for persecuted Christians, but also for the persecuted from other beliefs.

Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images – Flags at a 2020 rally outside the White House in support of the persecuted Uyghurs.

Further reading about FORB in the World on HRWF website





Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1344

WORLD : Apostasy & death penalty: 29 NGOs against death penalty

Apostasy & death penalty: Over 90 NGOs and individuals against death penalty

Jubilee Campaign (10.10.2022) – Website – On 10th October 2022, over 90 individuals and organisations have signed a Charter calling on countries which continue mandate the death penalty for non-violent conduct, including apostasy and blasphemy, to repeal such laws. Apostasy and blasphemy laws violate core tenets of freedom of religion and belief and expression.

Apostasy and blasphemy laws not only have a chilling effect on a plethora of human rights but place individuals accused under threat of torture from state and non-state actors. This was brought up during the Human Rights Council in a statement delivered by Yemeni Christian convert – Musheer – the first oral statement from a Christian Yemeni. Yemen is one of the 11 countries where leaving the state interpretation of Islam can lead to the death penalty.  The UN experts on torture and extrajudicial killings released a statement on the link between the death penalty and torture.

The total number of countries with the death penalty for apostasy and blasphemy has reduced since the Monash University released its report Killing in the Name of God: State-Sanctioned Violations of Religious Freedom on year ago. Since the Charter was signed on, the United Arab Emirates, dropped the death penalty for apostasy, bringing the at least 12 countries which maintain the death penalty for apostasy or blasphemy down to 11.

The Charter in addition to condemning the continued sanction of the death penalty for apostasy and blasphemy, also calls on states to take a concrete action and support specific language calling for the repeal of the death penalty for apostasy and blasphemy in two respective resolutions the moratorium on the death penalty and extrajudicial executions. 

The initial release of the Charter on 22 August 2022, International Day Commemorating the Victims of Acts of Violence Based on Religion or Belief, was followed up by the a multi-faith and multi-disciplinary delegation of members of the International Religious Freedom Summit Global Campaign to Repeal Apostasy and Blasphemy Laws visiting UN Permanent Missions in New York in mid-September. The coalition included lawyer Kola Alapinni from Nigeria who serves as the legal counsel for Yahaya Sharif-Aminu – a Sufi singer Nigerian authorities sentenced to death. They are now calling on the remaining states which are mostly Muslim-majority to: ” separate the punitive Islamic Laws from Islam,” Soraya M. Deen MA.

Organizations

Coptic Solidarity

Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain

Council of Ex-Muslims of Sri Lanka

Eglise Protestante d’Algérie

Eleos Justice

European Office Church of Scientology for Public Affairs and Human Rights

Ex-Muslims of India

Ex-Muslims of North America

Ex-Muslims of Toronto

Faithless Hijabi

Forum for Religious Freedom – Europe

Foundation for Religious Freedom

Fundacion para la Mejora de la Vida, la Cultura y la Sociedad

Genocide Watch

Humanists Association of Sri Lanka

Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust

International Christian Concern

International Human Rights Committee

International Institute for Religious Freedom

International Panel of Parliamentarians for Freedom of Religion or Belief Steering Group

International Religious Liberty Association

Jubilee Campaign Netherlands

Jubilee Campaign USA

LEAH Foundation

Lumières Sans Frontières

M.A.L.I. Morocco

Minority Concern

Muslims for Progressive Values

Muslim Women Speakers

Parity

Prayer Pioneers

Rumi Forum

Secular Coalition for America

Set My People Free

Society for Humanistic Judaism

Tahrir Alnisa Foundation

The Clergy Project

Voice for Justice

Widows and Orphans

World Evangelical Alliance

 

(Formerly) from parliaments:

Baroness Caroline Cox – Founder, Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust; Independent Member, United Kingdom House of Lords

Ján Figel – Former European Union Commissioner; Former European Union Freedom of Religion or Belief Special Envoy; Member, International Religious Freedom or Belief Alliance Council of Experts

Farahnaz Ispahani – Former Pakistan Parliamentarian; Senior Fellow, Religious Freedom Institute

Abid Raja – Member of Parliament, Norway

Joël Voordewind – Former Member, House of Representatives of the Netherlands

 

Other signatories are academics, journalists, lawyers, faith leaders, human rights advocates, civil society members.

Further reading about FORB in the World on HRWF website





Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1344

WORLD : The FoRB Int’l Ministerial Conference in London, a great mass

The FoRB International Ministerial Conference in London, a great mass

HRWF (12.08.2022) – On the 5th and 6th July, the UK-Government hosted the first in-person International Ministerial Conference on this topic since 2019 (the US held the two first ministerial conferences in 2018 and 2019). The official events were organized at the Queen Elizabeth II Center in London where only a number of NGOs were granted full access while others had only limited or no access.

 

The Ministerial Conference brought together government members, officials, faith and belief leaders and civil society organisations from over 100 countries and international organizations to act in promoting respect between different religious and non-religious communities around the world. More than 700 delegates participated in the official events and around a hundred fringe sessions were organized, according to the moderator of the opening ceremony.

The purpose of the conference, coordinated by MP Fiona Bruce, UK Special Envoy on FoRB, and the FCDO team (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office), was to identify what is working in different countries as regards FoRB, explore where and how we can apply new lessons and approaches and inspire the next generation to champion and defend FoRB for everyone all around the world.

A day after the conference, the UK government organized a meeting with some relevant stakeholders, for a “Strategic Discussion on Next Steps”, to cover scene-setting reflections and practical steps after the Ministerial.

The strategic discussion on the next steps meeting counted among the respondents Mervyn Thomas (Chair of the UK FoRB Forum), Lord Alton of Liverpool (Vice-Chair of the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on International FoRB), Greg Mitchell (Chair of the US International Religious Freedom Roundtable Secretariat), Nadine Maenza (former Chair of US Commission on International Religious Freedom), Jos Douma (Netherlands Special Envoy on Freedom of Religion or Belief) Sam Brownback (former US Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom), Chris Seiple from the Institute of Global Engagement, and Jim Shannon (Co-Chair of the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on International FoRB). Other subjects discussed were “Civil Society, Parliamentarians and Academics”, “FoRB and the Media” and “Funding FoRB”.

 

Opening ceremony

 

The opening plenary titled “FoRB, a right for everyone everywhere” started with a choir made up of about 30 refugees of many faiths from a wide range of countries. There were video addresses by Prince Charles and then Prime Minister Boris Johnson. There were also speeches by Lord Ahmad, former Prime Minister’s Special Envoy on FoRB and now Minister for Human Rights, by Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury since 2013 and other representatives of various faiths as well as humanism. The concluding speech was held by Mary Elizabeth Truss, a candidate to the succession of Boris Johnson and a Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs since 2021 and a Minister for Women and Equalities since 2019.

 

Discussion panels

 

Discussion panels with the participation of scholars and practitioners on the ground covered three main issues related to FoRB: prevention, protection and promotion.

 

The section devoted to the prevention of the degradation of FoRB was divided in four sessions: FoRB in times of conflict and insecurity – Civil society as a driver for change – FoRB and the media – Early warning prevention.

 

The part on the protection of FoRB was divided into three sessions: Protecting cultural and religious heritage – Inspiring Parliamentarians – Declaration on Humanity.

 

The section on the promotion of FoRB covered the following issues: Innovation Hub: FoRB in the Future – Engaging the next generation – FoRB in education – Promoting FoRB in the face of global challenges – Promoting FoRB in the digital world.

 

All these panels were of very high quality and a source of inspiration both for country delegates and civil society organizations.

 

The closing plenary panel discussion was titled “Reflections and the way forward.”

 

Statements by states’ delegates

 

Soothing statements – 3 to 5 minutes each – were made by representatives of about 40 states to praise their national policies concerning the protection and the promotion of FoRB at home and abroad.[i] Their self-praising declarations could have been more effectively replaced by sessions privileging public and private interactions between NGOs and state delegates.

 

A few international institutions such as the UN Alliance of Civilizations, Council of Europe, European Union also made statements. Strange though it may be, it is to be noted that the OSCE/ ODIHR was absent from this part of the Ministerial and was given an event at the Civil Society limited area.

 

Intrumentalisation of the Ministerial by States self-praising their policies

 

A few examples of the self-promotion and political instrumentalization by some of the 40 participating states[ii].

 

H.E. Ambassador of France, Jean-Christophe Peaucelle, Advisor for Religious Affairs, limited himself to a brief and very general speech recalling the fundamental principles of freedom of conscience and belief as enshrined in the French constitution and rooted in the laïcité . His statement did not go beyond a simple statement praising France for defending religious freedom at home and abroad but he avoided quite a number of controversial issues, such as the law on separatism obviously targeting Muslims and the anti-cult policies stigmatizing minority religious and belief groups for over two decades.

 

Ambassador of Greece to the UK, H.E. Mr Ioannis Raptakis reaffirmed his commitment to combating anti-Semitism and stressed Greece’s full respect for the rights of Muslims, pointing out that his country had more mosques than any other European country, which is not proven. He also condemned the transformation of the status of the Hagia Sophia from a museum to an active mosque in Istanbul. And he reaffirmed his full support for the Ecumenical Patriarchate which has been strangled for decades by the Turkish authorities. In the background of this intervention, the permanent issues of tension with Turkey, a country with a Muslim majority and a secular enemy of Greece, loomed large.

 

Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade of Hungary, H.E. Péter Szijjártó praised the country’s Christian roots, thanks to which it had been able to resist several invasions and retain its identity. The defence of Catholic Christianity was at the centre of his speech. In ten years, 3,000 Catholic churches have been built in the Hungarian-populated regions of Central Europe and the number of Catholic schools has doubled, he said. Hungary’s two priorities are the fight against the persecution of Christians in the world and aggressive secularism. An aid programme, “Hungary Helps”, has been financed for 500,000 persecuted Christians in the world, including their resettlement in their countries of origin from which they had to flee. Apart from the sole defense of Christians, he avoided explaining why some minority groups cannot fully enjoy freedom of religion or belief and are discriminated against.

 

Finland’s State Secretary to the Minister for Foreign Affairs, H.E. Johanna Sumuvuori focused on the intersection between religious freedom and LGBT, violence against women and reproductive rights. She also stressed that Finland defends religious freedom in the OSCE, the Council of Europe and the UN. However, she avoided addressing attempts to criminalise the freedom of expression of a Christian Finnish MP on a controversial issue which led to a trial that the politician finally won.

 

Complaints of NGOs and recommendations

 

The registration for the access to the Queen Elizabeth II Center was denied, without any convincing reasons, to many NGOs who had applied for it. Others got the privilege to have full access to the events held on the ground-floor.  A third group of NGOs were parked on the first floor of the building without any authorization to join the attendees of the discussion panels and official country delegations; public or private interaction between the representatives of these NGOs was impossible.

 

Human Rights Without Frontiers (HRWF) which had not applied for registration at the Ministerial was told about a number of common recriminations from NGOs:

 

“We never got an answer when we tried to apply.”

 

“We wonder why some NGOs were registered while other were not. What are the real reasons hidden between such discrimination?”

 

“I know a case where a local faith leader whose name was proposed only few days before the conference got full access to all the events of the Ministerial while I was left outside although I had applied three weeks in advance. When I tried to go to the ground-floor to talk with some officials and panelists, I was not allowed to get in although 80% of the seats were empty.”

 

“It was weird to see that some of the participants were limited to the ground and first floors, while others like me had access to the upper levels where you could meet with officials. You could not see the criteria that were used to discriminate that way, and in fact, there was no reason for this. It would have been much better to have everyone with the same access, in an all-inclusive way.”

 

In conclusion, while the Ministerial was a big success in terms of content, a lot more needed to be done at the organizational level, in terms of transparency and equal opportunities for all.

 

Unfortunate was also the decision to organize a program of side events for NGOs on the same two days as the Ministerial at another prestigious location, the British Parliament. They could have been held before or as a follow up of the Ministerial and civil society organizations would have maximized their participation. One can wonder about the reasons for a choice of overlapping agendas. The publicity about this parallel conference for NGOs, which was open to all without any distinction or restriction, was also a success as members of the Parliament attended, chaired or sponsored the events, and here interacted with all civil society organizations.

 

It is to be hoped that the criticisms and problematic issues raised by grassroot activists will be heard and taken into account for the next Ministerial, whoever will organize it.

 

Overall, the great mass for freedom of religion or belief driven by the UK and US governments to ensure that this vital human right be raised, exposed and protected was a very important step in moving the political momentum in the right direction.

_____________________

[i] Watch the over 60 videos of those statements at https://vimeo.com/user169814059

[ii] Order of the list of the videos on Vimeo: United Nations (Alliance of Civilizations) – The United States of America -The Swiss Confederation – The State of Israel – The Republic of Uzbekistan – The Republic of Slovenia – The Republic of Sierra Leone – The Republic of Serbia – The Republic of Poland – The Republic of Malta – The Republic of Madagascar – The Republic of Lithuania – The Republic of Latvia – The Republic of Kazakhstan – The Republic of Finland – The Republic of Cyprus – The Republic of Croatia – The Republic of Costa Rica – The Republic of Colombia – The Republic of Cameroun – The Republic of Austria – The Republic of Armenia – The Republic of Albania – The People’s Republic of Bangladesh – The Lebanese Republic – The Kingdom of the Netherlands – The Kingdom of Thailand – The Kingdom of Norway – The Kingdom of Denmark – The Kingdom of Bahrain – The Italian Republic – Hellenic Republic – The French Republic – The Federative Republic of Brazil – The Federal Republic of Nigeria – The Co-operative Republic of Guyana – The Commonwealth of Australia – The Arab Republic of Egypt – Taiwan -Sovereign Military Order of Malta (SMOM) – Slovak Republic – Romania – Hungary – European Union – Council of Europe – Canada.

Further reading about FORB in the World on HRWF website

 





Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1342

Notice: Undefined index: et_header_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1343

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1344

WORLD: USA publishes its 2022 Report on Trafficking in Persons on 188 countries

USA publishes its 2022 Report on Trafficking in Persons on 188 countries

 

US State Department (20.07.2022) – https://bit.ly/3PuOsSX – The State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons Visit disclaimer page has released the 2022 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report Visit disclaimer page, a comprehensive examination of how 188 countries and territories are preventing trafficking, protecting individuals impacted by trafficking, and prosecuting traffickers.

 

This year’s TIP Report expressly acknowledges the critical role of individuals with lived experience in developing effective anti-trafficking policies, procedures, and programs. Federal agencies and non-governmental organizations increasingly consult lived experience experts through advisory councils and training and technical assistance (T/TA) centers. Aligning with this sentiment, OTIP integrates survivor involvement throughout T/TA activities provided through its National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center (NHTTAC); in FY21, 51 individuals with lived experience partnered with NHTTAC as consultants. Through NHTTAC, OTIP also convenes the Human Trafficking Leadership Academy, cohorts of survivors leaders and allied professionals who develop recommendations for improving anti-trafficking programming.

 

Survivors of human trafficking know — through deeply painful experience — the tactics that traffickers use, the obstacles that survivors face as they get free, the support that can help the most as they work to rebuild their lives. So what the report emphasizes and what I want to emphasize today is that need for us to listen — listen to them, empower them, partner with them at every level of our work. — Secretary of State Antony Blinken Visit disclaimer page

 

The United States (U.S.) remained on Tier 1 in the 2022 TIP Report based on continued efforts to address human trafficking. The TIP Report notes the U.S. significantly increased service provision to individuals who have experienced trafficking and strengthened inter- and intra-agency coordination through the National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking Visit disclaimer page. However, the TIP Report highlighted areas of needed improvement, including a “continued lack of progress to comprehensively address labor trafficking” and how “survivors continued to be arrested for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit.”

 

The 2022 TIP Report offers prioritized recommendations for the U.S. to improve anti-trafficking efforts. These recommendations include “assess government systems and programs to ensure they advance equity for and decrease the vulnerability of marginalized communities to human trafficking” and “improve access to emergency and long-term housing” for individuals impacted by human trafficking. Learn more about the work OTIP is doing to strengthen health equity and ensure access to safestable housing.

 

Read the full 2022 TIP Report Visit disclaimer page (PDF) and watch the launch ceremony Visit disclaimer page.

 

Country rankings

 

TIER 1 (30 countries)

ARGENTINA – AUSTRALIA –  AUSTRIA – THE BAHAMAS – BAHRAIN – BELGIUM – CANADA – CHILE – COLOMBIA – CYPRUS – CZECH REPUBLIC – ESTONIA – FINLAND – FRANCE – GEORGIA – GERMANY – GUYANA – ICELAND – LITHUANIA – LUXEMBOURG –  NAMIBIA – NETHERLANDS – PHILIPPINES – SINGAPORE –  SLOVENIA – SPAIN – SWEDEN – TAIWAN – UNITED KINGDOM – UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

TIER 2

ALBANIA – ANGOLA – ARMENIA – AZERBAIJAN – BANGLADESH – BARBADOS – BELIZE – BENIN – BOLIVIA – BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA – BOTSWANA – BRAZIL – BURUNDI – CABO VERDE – CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO – COSTA RICA – COTE D’IVOIRE – CROATIA – DENMARK – DOMINICAN REPUBLIC – ECUADOR – EGYPT – FIJI – THE GAMBIA – GHANA – GREECE – GUATEMALA –  HONDURAS –  HUNGARY – INDIA – IRAQ – IRELAND – ISRAEL – ITALY – JAMAICA – JAPAN – JORDAN – KAZAKHSTAN – KENYA – REPUBLIC OF KOREA – KOSOVO – KYRGYZ REPUBLIC – LAOS – LATVIA – LEBANON – LESOTHO – LIBERIA – MALAWI – MALDIVES – MALTA – MARSHALL ISLANDS – MAURITIUS -MEXICO – MICRONESIA – MOLDOVA – MONGOLIA – MONTENEGRO – MOROCCO – MOZAMBIQUE – NEPAL – NEW ZEALAND – NIGER – NIGERIA – NORTH MACEDONIA – NORWAY – OMAN – PAKISTAN – PANAMA – PARAGUAY – PERU – POLAND – PORTUGAL – QATAR – ROMANIA – RWANDA – SAUDI ARABIA – SEYCHELLES – SIERRA LEONE – SLOVAK REPUBLIC – SOLOMON ISLANDS – SRI LANKA – ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES – SUDAN – SURINAME – SWITZERLAND – TAJIKISTAN -TANZANIA – THAILAND – UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – TIMOR LESTE – TOGO – TUNISIA – TURKEY – UGANDA – UKRAINE – URUGUAY – UZBEKISTAN – VANUATU

 

TIER 2 WATCH LIST

ALGERIA – ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA – ARUBA – BHUTAN – BULGARIA – BURKINA FASO – CAMEROON – CHAD – COMOROS – DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO – DJIBOUTI – EL SALVADOR EQUATORIAL – GUINEA – ESWATINI – ETHIOPIA – GABON – GUINEA – HAITI – HONG KONG – INDONESIA – KUWAIT – MADAGASCAR – MALI – MAURITANIA – PALAU – PAPUA NEW GUINEA – SAINT LUCIA – SENEGAL – SERBIA – SOUTH AFRICA – TONGA – TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO – ZAMBIA – ZIMBABWE

 

TIER 3

AFGHANISTAN – BELARUS – BRUNEI – BURMA – CAMBODIA – PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA – CUBA – CURAĆAO – ERITREA – GUINEA BISSAU – IRAN – DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA – MACAU – MALAYSIA – NICARAGUA – RUSSIA – SINT MAARTEN – SOUTH SUDAN – SYRIA – TURKMENISTAN – VENEZUELA – VIETNAM

 

SPECIAL CASE

LIBYA-SOMALIA-YEMEN

 

Photo credits: state.gov


Notice: Undefined index: et_footer_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1392

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1392

Notice: Undefined index: et_footer_layout in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1393

Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1393

Notice: Undefined index: et_template in /home/hrwfe90/domains/hrwf.eu/public_html/wp-content/plugins/pdf-print/pdf-print.php on line 1394