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NEPAL: Pastor sentenced to one year in prison for missionary activities

Pastor imprisoned for missionary activities

HRWF (04.08.2022) – In July, Pastor Keshav Acharya was sentenced to one year in prison for attempting to convert Hindus in Nepal. Authorities originally arrested him for supposedly spreading COVID-19 misinformation. After they released him on bail, they arrested him two more times and accused him of attempting to coerce Hindus to convert to Christianity.

In November 2021, a court had sentenced him to two years in jail and a fine of 20,000 rupees (US$166) for violating the Himalayan country’s repressive anti-conversion law.

The sentence from the court in Dolpa district in Pokhara region of western Nepal on 30 November came about a week after it found Pastor Keshav Raj Acharya from Abundant Harvest Church guilty of proselytization.

The evangelical pastor was first arrested on 23 March 2021 by police in Kaski district after a YouTube video of him went viral on social media. In the video it was said that Covid-19 could be healed through Christian prayer.

Pastor Acharya denied uploading the video on the internet and he was released on bail about a month later.

However, he was immediately rearrested without a warrant, sent to prison and then charged under the anti-conversion law, accused of proselytizing and distributing Christian tracts in Dolpa district.

Anti-missionary legislation

Nepal is a former Hindu kingdom. The 2015 constitution declared the state a secular democracy.

Proselytization is a serious criminal offense, which began with adoption of the new constitution in 2015. Article 26 (3) of the constitution says: “No person shall behave, act or make others act to disturb public law and order situation or convert a person of one religion to another or disturb the religion of other people … such an act shall be punished by law.”

Nepal’s government amended the Penal Code in 2018 and made conversion a criminal offense. Anyone found guilty of conversion and even encouraging conversion can be imprisoned for up to five years and fined up to 50,000 rupees ($416).

About 81 percent of Nepal’s 29 million people are Hindu, Buddhists account for 9 percent, Muslims 4.4 percent and Christians 1.4 percent, according to the 2011 census.

Photo : Pastor Keshav Raj Acharya was sentenced to two years in prison and a fine of 20,000 rupees (US$166) for violating Nepal’s anti-conversion law. (Photo: Christian Solidarity Worldwide)

Further reading about FORB in Nepal on HRWF website





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NEPAL: Pastor released on bail after a sentence to 2 years in prison

Pastor Keshav released on bail pending appeal after being sentenced to 2 years in prison

HRWF/ IRFR (12.02.2022) – The International Religious Freedom Roundtable (IRFR) in the US is issuing an urgent call for the dropping of all charges against Protestant pastor Keshav Raj Acharya (33) of the Abundant Harvest Church in Pokhara city. On 19 December 2021, he was released on bail pending appeal.

 

On November 30 November 2021, Dolpa District Court in Nepal sentenced Pastor Keshav to two years imprisonment and a fine of 20 000 Nepali Rupees under Section 158 (1) and (2) of Nepal’s Penal Code (2017) for sharing his faith. On 22 November, he was found guilty of proselytisation and immediately arrested and placed in prison. However, he was released on bail by the High Court Jumla after receiving an appeal against the verdict of the District Court. While we welcome his release on bail by the High Court, we remain concerned that the charges against him at the District Court Kaski for the same offence that have not been dropped yet. We are also concerned about the discriminatory treatment of Pastor Keshav throughout the process.

 

Police authorities first arrested Pastor Acharya Keshav in March 2020 from his home without an arrest warrant and did not file charges officially against Pastor Keshav until a week later in April when another District Administration Office in Kaski accused Pastor Acharya for disseminating false information for saying “Jesus can cure Corona” and praying for the stop of the Coronavirus in Jesus’ name. The authorities then filed two additional charges targeting the pastor for exercising his freedom of expression by accusing him of proselytizing and “outraging religious feeling” under Section 158 and 156 of the Muluki Criminal Code, 2017 respectively.[1] Several members of the International Religious Freedom Roundtable submitted a letter addressed to the earlier Attorney General Mr. Agni Prasad Kharel calling for the dropping of all charges against Pastor Keshav and drawing attention to the arbitrary nature of his arrest and detention.[2] The US State Department’s International Religious Freedom report also mentions the Nepal authorities’ arbitrary arrest of Pastor Keshav.[3]

 

In September 2021 police arrested two South Korean Catholic nuns for their charitable work and re-arrested and sentenced Pastor Keshav in November 2021.[4]

 

___________________

 

 

1 National Penal Code Act Nepal 2017, http://www.moljpa.gov.np/en/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Penal-Code-English-Revised-1.pdf . 2017 

 

2 Religious Freedom Roundtable Calls for Charges to Be Dropped against Pastor, Christian Today, 27 July 2020, https://www.christiantoday.com/article/religious.freedom.roundtable.calls.for.charges.to.be.dropped.against.pastor/135268.htm

 

3 United States Department of State, 2020 Report on International Religious Freedom – Nepal, 12 May 2021, https://www.state.gov/reports/2020-report-on-international-religious-freedom/nepal/.

 

4 “Korean Missionary Nuns Granted Bail in Nepal on Conversion Charges – UCA News.” Ucanews.com, https://www.ucanews.com/news/korean-missionary-nuns-granted-bail-in-nepal-on-conversion-charges/95031; “Nepal Sentences Pastor to Two Years for Conversion – UCA News.” Ucanews.com, https://www.ucanews.com/news/nepal-sentences-pastor-to-two-years-for-conversion/95181





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NEPAL: Pastor sentenced to 2 years in prison for saying prayer can heal COVID-19

Pastor in Nepal sentenced to 2 years in prison for saying prayer can heal COVID-19

By Anugrah Kumar

 

The Christian Post (05.12.2021) – https://bit.ly/3Glq8hr – A court in Nepal has sentenced a pastor to two years in prison under the country’s harsh anti-conversion law for merely saying that prayers can heal COVID-19, according to reports.

 

The District Court in Dolpa this week sentenced Pastor Keshab Raj Acharya to two years in prison and a fine of $165 (20,000 Rupees) for suggesting on social media that prayer could bring healing from the coronavirus, the U.S.-based persecution watchdog International Christian Concern said in a statement.

 

Pastor Acharya was first arrested on March 23 last year from his home in Pokhara, Gandaki Pradesh Province, on charges of spreading false information regarding COVID-19. Though he was released about a fortnight later, he was rearrested moments later on charges of “outraging religious feelings” and “proselytizing.”

 

After more than three months in prison, he was released on July 3, 2020, after paying bail equal to about $2,500.

 

In a viral video published on the internet, Pastor Acharya prayed in front of his congregation, saying, “Hey, corona — you go and die. May all your deeds be destroyed by the power of the Lord Jesus. I rebuke you, corona, in the name of Lord Jesus Christ. By the power or the ruler of this Creation, I rebuke you. … By the power in the name of Lord Jesus Christ, corona, go away and die.”

 

William Stark, ICC’s regional manager for South Asia, said: “For more than a year, authorities in the Dolpa District have seemed bent on convicting Pastor Acharya of something and punishing him for simply being a Christian pastor. Since the new constitution was adopted in 2015, Nepalese Christians have been concerned that Article 26 and its enacting laws would be used to target their community.”

 

Stark added that “Nepal’s sweeping anti-conversion law must be repealed if religious freedom is truly a right to be enjoyed by the country’s citizens.”

 

After his release last July, Acharya had told Morning Star News that it was a “very difficult” time for him.

 

“I would think of my little children and my wife, and I would cry out to the Lord in prayer. I would look up at Him in hope that if it is in His will that I should be put through this, He would get me out of this,” he said at the time.

 

Acharya told the outlet he believed government officials and police worked together against him. “They were laying a thorough plan to make sure I would stay in the jail for a longer period.”

 

Senior Counsel Govinda Bandi, who was defending the pastor, told the U.K.-based Christian Solidarity Worldwide at the time that his repeated arrest was a “very worrying sign of the trajectory of religious freedom in this country.”

 

“The police are clearly acting outside the scope of the constitution and without any regard to the rules of criminal procedure,” Bandi said. “There seems to be a concerted effort to use the draconian provisions in the Penal Code to target him that will also threaten the wider minority community with penal sanctions for practicing their religion or belief. Furthermore, the whole allegation against him, is forged on unfounded and prejudiced allegations. This is without a doubt a targeted persecution and a travesty of our justice system.”

 

Christians have been under attack since before the promulgation of the country’s new constitution in September 2015.

 

Low-intensity blasts occurred in two churches in east Nepal around the time. Pamphlets promoting Hindu nationalism were found at each of the churches and a nationalist group, Hindu Morcha Nepal, issued a press statement calling for Christian leaders to leave the country and for Christian converts to return to Hinduism.

 

The constitution establishes Nepal as a secular country but also effectively bans evangelism, as it states that no one is allowed to make an attempt to convert people of other religions to his or her own. It also calls for the protection of Hinduism, the majority religion.

 

Article 26 (3) of the constitution states: “No person shall behave, act or make others act to disturb public law and order situation or convert a person of one religion to another or disturb the religion of other people…such an act shall be punished by law.”

In 2018, Nepal’s government added the controversial portion of the constitution to the country’s criminal code, which states that an individual found guilty of even encouraging religious conversions can be fined up to $670 (50,000 rupees) and imprisoned for up to five years.

 

Hindu nationalist groups in Nepal allege that Hinduism is under threat as more people could be converted into Christianity. They have been calling for the exclusion of the term “secularism” — which in the South Asian context means equal treatment of all religions by the State — from the charter of Nepal, which was a Hindu monarchy until 2006.

 

Persecution watchdog Open Doors USA ranks Nepal at No. 34 on its World Watch List of 50 countries where it is most difficult to be a Christian.

 

Photo : Pastor Keshab Acharya | Morning Star News





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NEPAL: Korean missionary nuns held in Nepal on conversion charges

Korean missionary nuns held in Nepal on conversion charges

At least nine Christians, including pastors, are facing court cases over conversion claims in the Hindu-majority country

UCA News (27.10.2021) – https://bit.ly/3jMC1UW – Two Catholic nuns from South Korea have been detained in Nepal for more than six weeks after they were arrested on charges of converting Hindus by coercion and allurement.

Sister Gemma Lucia Kim and Sister Martha Park Byongsuk of the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres congregation were arrested on Sept. 14 based on an anonymous complaint. They were kept in police custody until Sept. 27 when they were sent to the district prison after bail was denied.

The nuns work among poor slum children in Pokhara, about 200 kilometers from capital Kathmandu.

“The Catholic community of the country is shocked to hear about the verdict” of the court rejecting the bail application, Bishop Paul Simick, the apostolic vicar of Nepal, said in a statement to papal charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN).

Bishop Simick expressed dismay over the arrest and bail denial of the elderly nuns.

“Despite all the assurances given to us that the sisters would be granted bail, the decision went against them,” said Bishop Simick, according to a report by Exaudi Catholic news website on Oct. 25.

“This act reveals not only bigotry on the part of those who accused the sisters but also ignorance of the needs of the poor”

 

Another church official, who requested anonymity, said that initially the hierarchy thought of not publicizing the arrests as it could lead to Hindu fundamentalists and Nepal’s anti-Christian media exaggerating facts.

“They will make their reports sound like the nuns were converting everyone in the guise of charity works,” he said.

Another two Koreans — a lay Catholic and a Protestant pastor — have also been arrested and detained on similar charges, the source said.

The bishop has visited the nuns and requested prayers for them during Sunday liturgy on Oct. 24.

The nuns have been managing Happy Home, a center that provides accommodation, food, education, medical services and skills training for about 120 slum children in Pokhara.

During the Covid-19 pandemic, they have distributed food rations to poor, vulnerable people. But some locals accused them of providing food to allure Hindus to become Catholics.

Bishop Simick said the allegations “of conversions are utterly baseless and unjust. This act reveals not only bigotry on the part of those who accused the sisters but also ignorance of the needs of the poor. We, as Catholics, do not indulge in forceful conversion and the Korean sisters are known for doing exclusively social work.”

He added: “The sisters have been dedicating themselves totally to the poor for so many years. Therefore, we would like to call for an in-depth inquiry into what happened.”

For decades, Christians have faced various levels of persecution in the Himalayan Hindu-majority nation.

About 81 percent of Nepal’s estimated 29 million people are Hindu, while Buddhists account for 9 percent, Muslims 4.4 percent and Christians 1.4 percent, according to the 2011 census.

“Christian groups and rights watchdogs have reported increasing hostility and persecution against Christians in Nepal in recent times”

 

There are about 10,000 Catholics in Nepal, church sources say. However, Protestants and Evangelical Christians are estimated to be 1.5 million, according to an official from Nepal Christian Society.

The World Database of Christians records Nepal’s Christian communities as one of the fastest growing in the world.

Christian groups and rights watchdogs have reported increasing hostility and persecution against Christians in Nepal in recent times.

B.P. Khanal, a prominent Christian writer and politician in Nepal, told UCA News in September that at least nine Christian men and women including pastors were facing court cases in Nepal on conversion charges.

ACN’s Religious Freedom Report 2021 documented a legal and social backlash against Christians following amendments to the country’s Penal Code in 2018 that bans proselytization and conversion to other faiths from Hinduism.

Christians including pastors and aid workers have been charged with conversion efforts, while foreign priests and nuns have been denied visas and forced to leave Nepal, ACN reported.

Photo : Sister Martha Park Byongsuk enjoys a midday meal with the children at St. Paul’s Happy Home in Pokhara Bus-Park slum in Nepal. She and her companion have been detained over religious conversion charges. (Photo: globalsistersreport.org)





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NEPAL: Christianity thrives in Nepal amid trials and tribulations

Hindu groups and political parties have accused Christians of converting low-caste Hindus with economic incentives

By Rock Ronald Rosario

UCA News (16.02.2021) – https://bit.ly/3uf7lPK – Christian social worker Chinimaya Blon ran an orphanage for poor and abandoned children in Dhankuta district of eastern Nepal for five years from 2011-16 until it was shut down following the government’s refusal to renew its license.

She took 14 children to the capital Kathmandu, where pastor Hari Tamang offered them shelter on the premises of his church.

Within nine days, police raided the church and arrested Blon and Tamang after accusing them of trafficking and attempted religious conversion of minors. The two spent six days in jail and were released on bail of 50,000 rupees (US$423).

The charge of trafficking was later dropped, but they are still fighting the charge of proselytizing, a serious crime under Nepal’s anti-conversion law.

Both accused face a fine of 50,000 rupees and a jail term up to five years under the anti-conversion law. Any foreigner found guilty of encouraging and promoting religious conversion can be deported within a week.

The ordeal of Blon and Tamang is just one example of how Christians are often targeted and abused in the Himalayan Hindu-majority nation for their faith and faith-based charities.

Persecution of Christians has intensified under Nepal’s new criminal legislation, the Civil and Criminal Codes 2018, which replaced the 165-year-old General Code. It includes laws guiding criminal and legal proceedings that include strict restrictions on religious conversion.

The legislation is in striking contrast to Nepal’s 2015 constitution, which allows freedom of religion and adopted secularism, democracy and human rights as key principles.

Rights activists and Christian leaders believe the anti-conversion law was specifically designed to target Christians amid long-running aggressive campaigns and allegations from radical and nationalist Hindu groups and political parties. In 2017, two parliamentarians said that Hinduism in the country was “teetering on the edge” due to Christian churches and missionaries, often with funding from the West.

The history of Christianity in Nepal spans more than five centuries marked by oppression and challenges amid the nation’s turbulent politics. Until 2007, Nepal was a Hindu kingdom for two centuries before the monarchy was overthrown. Then came the communist-ruled government, followed by Hindu nationalist rule. In each period, Christianity has been targeted and attacked in various forms that included persecution and expulsion of Christians and missionaries.

Since 2018, when the anti-conversion law was introduced, police have investigated at least 16 cases of religious conversion filed against Christians by state and non-state actors.

Government officials often side with Hindu groups who come up with baseless accusations against Christians over illegal religious conversions.

“Most reported cases that come regarding religious conversion are from the Christian religion,” Chakra Bahadur Budha, a Ministry of Home Affairs spokesperson, told Global Press Journal.

Open Doors, a US-based Christian charity, listed Nepal as one of the countries with a high level of Christian persecution. Many Hindus view conversion to Christianity as “deviating from the faith of the ancestors and therefore breaking with their culture and their national identity.” Christian converts face tremendous pressure from their families, friends, community and government officials.

Christians have regularly been the victims of violence in Nepal

In 2009, a Hindu extremist group, Nepal Defense Army, bombed the Assumption Cathedral in Kathmandu, leaving three Catholics dead and many injured. In 2012, the group threatened a church official with further bomb attacks.

In 2017, arsonists attempted to set fire to the cathedral, leaving parts of the priests’ residence and the western part of the cathedral damaged while a car and two motorbikes were completely burned.

In 2018, four churches were burned by unknown arsonists. In five days of attacks from May 5, Mahima Church in Dhangadhi, Emmanuel Church in Kanchanpur, Emmanuel Church Budor in Doti and Hebron Church in Panchthar were set on fire.

In April 2019, Pastor Dilliram Paudel, secretary-general of the Nepal Christian Society (NCS), was arrested with four other Christians at a hotel in Dang district in western Nepal for alleged attempted religious conversion. The group, including an Indian and one American, had been invited by local churches to speak to a group of pastors. The pastor and others were later released on bail after a week in custody, while the American woman narrowly escaped being deported thanks to lobbying by church and rights groups.

About 8,000 Catholics live in the Apostolic Vicariate of Nepal, though Catholicism in the country dates back to the 16th century from the time of Portuguese rule in the present Indian state of Goa.

But there are an estimated 2-3 million Christians in Nepal, according to the National Federation of Christians. Most Christians belong to Protestant and evangelical churches, who number as many as 12,000 across the country.

The World Christian Database lists Nepal among countries with the fastest-growing Christian populations. Most Christians are from remote, impoverished Dalit (former untouchables) communities who face widespread discrimination and abuses from upper-caste Hindus who dominate the four-tier social caste system. A Dalit convert once lamented that upper-caste Hindus treat street dogs better than lower-caste people.

Also included in the Christian flow are the most marginalized and disadvantaged ethnic groups like Chepangs, who struggle to survive amid a lack of education and employment.

Escape from endemic discrimination

The rising switch to Christianity has more to do with socioeconomic conditions than a genuine thirst for the faith. For many, Christianity offers solace and an escape from the endemic discrimination, poverty and sickness that plague many parts of Nepal.

About 25 percent of Nepalese live below the poverty line in a country of about 30 million where a thriving tourism industry, the main economic lifeline, has slowed to a trickle. The devastating earthquake in 2015 that killed over 9,000 people pushed some 3-5 percent Nepalese into poverty.

The nation’s hospital system is fragile and some 22 percent of people don’t have access to basic health services, largely because only about 5 percent of Nepal’s national budget is allocated to health care.

Unemployment in Nepal is about 2 percent but the International Labor Organization noted that about 19 percent of people aged 15-30 are unemployed. Corruption is endemic in Nepal as the country stands 117th out of 180 countries in the Global Corruption Index

Despite repressive regimes, Christian missionaries and church groups have been present in Nepal and offered hope and support to socially and economically excluded groups with food, clothes, employment and humanitarian aid.

These groups have been attracted to Christianity as they have long sought to get away from deep-rooted, caste-based and discriminatory social structures. To the rebels, the Christian faith offers a liberation from long-running injustices.

Yet Hindu religious groups and upper-class Hindus in political parties have accused Christian missionaries and church groups of converting Hindus by luring them with money and other economic incentives, which is nothing but a shameless cover to hide the structural fault lines in Nepal’s social and state systems.

Christian groups have appealed to the authorities to allocate spaces for cemeteries amid a shortage of burial sites, but their pleas fell on deaf ears.

Following the 2015 earthquake, even government claimed that Christian groups converted many people while providing aid. Christian leaders refuted the allegations as groundless as church groups including Catholic charity Caritas Nepal were among the first to respond with relief and rehabilitation.

Christian charities are credited with reaching out to rural, remote regions with food, education and health services where government and other private agencies have failed.

Thus, as long as Christianity offers love and hope to beleaguered Nepalese people, the faith will continue to rise and shine in the shadow of Hindu religious and cultural hegemony.

Christian groups across the world need to pay more attention to the plight of their Christian brothers and sisters in Nepal.

Photo : Hindu devotees perform rituals after a ceremonial bath in the holy Bagmati River during the month-long Swasthani festival at the Pashupatinath Temple in Kathmandu on Feb. 11. (Photo: Prakash Mathema/AFP)


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