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WORLD: USA publishes its 2022 Report on Trafficking in Persons on 188 countries

USA publishes its 2022 Report on Trafficking in Persons on 188 countries

 

US State Department (20.07.2022) – https://bit.ly/3PuOsSX – The State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons Visit disclaimer page has released the 2022 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report Visit disclaimer page, a comprehensive examination of how 188 countries and territories are preventing trafficking, protecting individuals impacted by trafficking, and prosecuting traffickers.

 

This year’s TIP Report expressly acknowledges the critical role of individuals with lived experience in developing effective anti-trafficking policies, procedures, and programs. Federal agencies and non-governmental organizations increasingly consult lived experience experts through advisory councils and training and technical assistance (T/TA) centers. Aligning with this sentiment, OTIP integrates survivor involvement throughout T/TA activities provided through its National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center (NHTTAC); in FY21, 51 individuals with lived experience partnered with NHTTAC as consultants. Through NHTTAC, OTIP also convenes the Human Trafficking Leadership Academy, cohorts of survivors leaders and allied professionals who develop recommendations for improving anti-trafficking programming.

 

Survivors of human trafficking know — through deeply painful experience — the tactics that traffickers use, the obstacles that survivors face as they get free, the support that can help the most as they work to rebuild their lives. So what the report emphasizes and what I want to emphasize today is that need for us to listen — listen to them, empower them, partner with them at every level of our work. — Secretary of State Antony Blinken Visit disclaimer page

 

The United States (U.S.) remained on Tier 1 in the 2022 TIP Report based on continued efforts to address human trafficking. The TIP Report notes the U.S. significantly increased service provision to individuals who have experienced trafficking and strengthened inter- and intra-agency coordination through the National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking Visit disclaimer page. However, the TIP Report highlighted areas of needed improvement, including a “continued lack of progress to comprehensively address labor trafficking” and how “survivors continued to be arrested for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit.”

 

The 2022 TIP Report offers prioritized recommendations for the U.S. to improve anti-trafficking efforts. These recommendations include “assess government systems and programs to ensure they advance equity for and decrease the vulnerability of marginalized communities to human trafficking” and “improve access to emergency and long-term housing” for individuals impacted by human trafficking. Learn more about the work OTIP is doing to strengthen health equity and ensure access to safestable housing.

 

Read the full 2022 TIP Report Visit disclaimer page (PDF) and watch the launch ceremony Visit disclaimer page.

 

Country rankings

 

TIER 1 (30 countries)

ARGENTINA – AUSTRALIA –  AUSTRIA – THE BAHAMAS – BAHRAIN – BELGIUM – CANADA – CHILE – COLOMBIA – CYPRUS – CZECH REPUBLIC – ESTONIA – FINLAND – FRANCE – GEORGIA – GERMANY – GUYANA – ICELAND – LITHUANIA – LUXEMBOURG –  NAMIBIA – NETHERLANDS – PHILIPPINES – SINGAPORE –  SLOVENIA – SPAIN – SWEDEN – TAIWAN – UNITED KINGDOM – UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

TIER 2

ALBANIA – ANGOLA – ARMENIA – AZERBAIJAN – BANGLADESH – BARBADOS – BELIZE – BENIN – BOLIVIA – BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA – BOTSWANA – BRAZIL – BURUNDI – CABO VERDE – CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO – COSTA RICA – COTE D’IVOIRE – CROATIA – DENMARK – DOMINICAN REPUBLIC – ECUADOR – EGYPT – FIJI – THE GAMBIA – GHANA – GREECE – GUATEMALA –  HONDURAS –  HUNGARY – INDIA – IRAQ – IRELAND – ISRAEL – ITALY – JAMAICA – JAPAN – JORDAN – KAZAKHSTAN – KENYA – REPUBLIC OF KOREA – KOSOVO – KYRGYZ REPUBLIC – LAOS – LATVIA – LEBANON – LESOTHO – LIBERIA – MALAWI – MALDIVES – MALTA – MARSHALL ISLANDS – MAURITIUS -MEXICO – MICRONESIA – MOLDOVA – MONGOLIA – MONTENEGRO – MOROCCO – MOZAMBIQUE – NEPAL – NEW ZEALAND – NIGER – NIGERIA – NORTH MACEDONIA – NORWAY – OMAN – PAKISTAN – PANAMA – PARAGUAY – PERU – POLAND – PORTUGAL – QATAR – ROMANIA – RWANDA – SAUDI ARABIA – SEYCHELLES – SIERRA LEONE – SLOVAK REPUBLIC – SOLOMON ISLANDS – SRI LANKA – ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES – SUDAN – SURINAME – SWITZERLAND – TAJIKISTAN -TANZANIA – THAILAND – UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – TIMOR LESTE – TOGO – TUNISIA – TURKEY – UGANDA – UKRAINE – URUGUAY – UZBEKISTAN – VANUATU

 

TIER 2 WATCH LIST

ALGERIA – ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA – ARUBA – BHUTAN – BULGARIA – BURKINA FASO – CAMEROON – CHAD – COMOROS – DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO – DJIBOUTI – EL SALVADOR EQUATORIAL – GUINEA – ESWATINI – ETHIOPIA – GABON – GUINEA – HAITI – HONG KONG – INDONESIA – KUWAIT – MADAGASCAR – MALI – MAURITANIA – PALAU – PAPUA NEW GUINEA – SAINT LUCIA – SENEGAL – SERBIA – SOUTH AFRICA – TONGA – TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO – ZAMBIA – ZIMBABWE

 

TIER 3

AFGHANISTAN – BELARUS – BRUNEI – BURMA – CAMBODIA – PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA – CUBA – CURAĆAO – ERITREA – GUINEA BISSAU – IRAN – DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA – MACAU – MALAYSIA – NICARAGUA – RUSSIA – SINT MAARTEN – SOUTH SUDAN – SYRIA – TURKMENISTAN – VENEZUELA – VIETNAM

 

SPECIAL CASE

LIBYA-SOMALIA-YEMEN

 

Photo credits: state.gov





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Statement by OSCE on need to strengthen anti-trafficking efforts in a time of crisis

OSCE (03.04.2020) – https://bit.ly/2x68Fvq – Valiant Richey, OSCE Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, today issued the following statement, in co-ordination with Albania’s OSCE Chairmanship, to the OSCE participating States on the COVID-19 pandemic. He urged that, “it is precisely when our global community is convulsed by a crisis of this magnitude that our obligation to combat the exploitation of vulnerable people becomes most acute”. His full statement read:

 

“With the spread of COVID-19, the world faces an unprecedented threat to public health, which, in turn, poses extraordinary challenges to the economic and social cohesion of all our communities. In the fight against this common enemy, many governments have taken strong preventive measures, often combined with public interventions aimed at alleviating some of the economic losses that those measures inevitably create.

 

Although the COVID-19 threat is universal, the negative consequences of this crisis will be disproportionally carried by the most vulnerable in our societies. Firstly, victims of trafficking face exceptional danger as entrenched systems of exploitation are thrown into disarray and traffickers seek to maintain their revenue through greater violence or new forms of exploitation. Meanwhile, access to shelters and other support structures is increasingly limited at a time when need is at its greatest. Secondly, as resources gravitate to address public health concerns, attention is diverted from deterring criminal actors, and vulnerable persons already living in precarious circumstances are now at greater risk for being swept into exploitative situations.

 

The consequences of the current crisis on victims are far-reaching. Trafficking for sexual exploitation is increasingly moving online where traffickers can keep their revenue intact and enhance the isolation of and control over victims, particularly women and girls, who comprise 94% of the victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation. Children, at a time of school closures and potentially more hours spent online, face a greater risk of online grooming. Victims of forced labour find themselves with even fewer options for survival and less legal protection. In the case of trafficking for organ removal, one of the darkest and least addressed forms of trafficking, the impacts of COVID-19 are starting to raise alarm.

 

In moments of crisis, traffickers will increase their recruitment as more and more people find themselves in dire economic straits. For this reason, it is essential that governments ensure equal access to healthcare, unemployment services, and other welfare services, regardless of recent employment history or legal status, to guarantee that those who need this support the most can effectively access it. Anyone without an income or other form of support is at risk of falling into the hands of traffickers. In these chaotic times, it is vital that States do not let their guard down, but instead strengthen their anti-trafficking efforts.

 

Human trafficking feeds off vulnerability — in particular, gender and economic inequality — and it is a symptom of frailty in our society. It is precisely when our global community is shaken by a crisis of this magnitude that our obligation to combat the exploitation of vulnerable people becomes most acute. Where trafficking goes unchecked and impunity reigns, the rule of law is undermined and the security and safety of all citizens, especially the most vulnerable, is threatened. For this reason, combating human trafficking is not just a law enforcement responsibility. It is a human, societal and security imperative, and an urgent priority.

 

The COVID-19 crisis will be remembered for generations, and we have just started to see its transformative impact on our lives. Today, as in all moments of historic change, we have the opportunity to steer our future in a better direction. Inclusive programmes ensuring protection to vulnerable groups can be a powerful tool to break the cycle of exploitation and strengthen exit pathways, giving a real alternative to those in need. With the necessary attention, adequate resources and the right programmes, we can start today to build a better and safer tomorrow for all.”


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